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Cinnamon a magic drug

26 Apr
Life is not about FINDING Yourself. It is about CREATING Yourself. 

OBSESSED is simply a word the lazy use to describe DEDICATION. 

Of all the items in my pantry, the one I never want to run out of is cinnamon. My dogs and I enjoy this amazing, deliciously fragrant spice every single day of the year. The dogs get cinnamon sprinkled over their food at every meal; I like it in and on everything from yogurt, lemonade, and chai tea to vegetable curry, baked apples, and rice pudding. 

Not only does cinnamon smell and taste great, it has many health benefits, as we’ll see below. 

But first, what is it and where does it come from? Cinnamon is a small tree that grows in India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Brazil, Vietnam, and Egypt; its bark is dried and rolled into cinnamon sticks (also called quills), then ground into powder. 

There are four varieties, but Ceylon cinnamon (its Latin name is Cinnamomum verum) and Cassia cinnamon (Cinnamomum cassia) are the most popular; Ceylon, also called true cinnamon, is sweeter, lighter in color, and more expensive than Cassia, which is the darker type of cinnamon more commonly found in supermarkets and Starbucks. Whichever variety you choose, it’s definitely worth it to spend a bit more on organic cinnamon, which tends to be even more wonderfully fragrant than its non-organic counterpart. 

Traditionally, cinammon has been used around the world to remedy flatulence, nausea, diarrhea, and painful menstrual periods. It’s also believed to boost energy, vitality, circulation, cognitive function and overall brain health, and to improve the digestion of dairy products. 

In one study, sniffing cinnamon was shown to result in improved brain function – test subjects performed better at memory and attention after a whiff of this spectacular spice. So if you’re working with your dog on learning new tricks, definitely offer him or her a sniff of cinnamon before you begin your training session! 

Recent studies have shown that just half a teaspoon of cinnamon a day helps to regulate blood sugar and raise insulin resistance; it actually boosts the body’s ability to use insulin to improve blood glucose levels. This is vital for anyone at risk for Diabetes – and that includes senior and overweight dogs. So in addition to feeding a low glycemic index dog food, top his kibble bowl off with cinnamon! Other studies reveal that cinnamon is antifungal; it works to combat Candida albicans, the fungus that causes yeast infections. These infections are often resistant to medication, but not to cinnamon. (Dogs who suffer from allergies are often prone to yeast infections). 

Cinnamon is also antibacterial, and slows down the spoilage of food. When I have to store part of a can of dog food overnight, I’ll sprinkle half a teaspoon of cinnamon over it before refrigerating (on a side note, never refrigerate dog food in the can – to preserve palatability, spoon it into a glass storage container with a plastic top). Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon even prevents the growth of E. Coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices! So for safety’s sake, be sure to add some cinnamon to your raw apple cider. 

An anti-inflammatory, cinnamon is great for senior dogs struggling with arthritis. With my K9 seniors, I’ve had great results mixing a half-teaspoon of cinnamon with a tablespoon of honey. This is the recipe used by researchers at Copenhagen University, where arthritis patients were able to walk without pain after just a week of taking cinnamon with honey every day. Yet more studies show that cinnamon can lower blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, and slow the growth of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells. 

Here’s a caveat: Cassia cinnamon (the darker, more common type) contains a compound called coumarin, which can damage the liver at high levels. One more reason to use Ceylon cinnamon instead! But Cassia cinnamon is safe as long as you don’t overdo it; a teaspoon or so every day with food will still be beneficial in all the ways described above, but won’t give you or your dog nearly as high a dose as the higher concentration found in, say, a cinnamon supplement capsule (which would contain a substantially higher amount of coumarin). 

Also, cinnamon has a mild anti-clotting effect on the blood, so too much can cause bleeding problems if a person is on blood-thinning medication such as aspirin. And pregnant women (or dogs) should not take too much cinnamon, as it may have a stimulating effect on the uterus. 

But in small amounts – half a teaspoon at every meal – cinnamon obviously does a lot more good than harm. Enjoy!

 Nature doesn’t put saturated fat in vegetables, mother’s milk, and other foods for kicks. It’s there for a reason. 

The only way to get rid of a temptation is to yield to it. 

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2 Comments

Posted by on April 26, 2011 in healing, health, naturopathy

 

Tags: , , ,

2 responses to “Cinnamon a magic drug

  1. sadaf@large

    April 26, 2011 at 3:06 PM

    You may already know that cinnamon is good for you, but did you know there is a mythological creature called the Cinnamon Bird? Here are some interesting facts and trivia about this extraordinary spice.

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum) is a tree belonging to the Lauraceae family. The bark of the tree is what is used as a spice.

    True cinnamon, or Ceylon cinnamon is native to Sri Lanka (formerly known as Ceylon).

    Cassia, a related spice, is sometimes sold as cinnamon but it is not “true cinnamon.” Cassia is sometimes called “Indonesian cinnamon” or “Chinese cinnamon.” In fact, most powdered cinnamon sold in the United States is actually cassia. It is harder to find true Ceylon cinnamon.

    Cinnamon gets is scent and flavor from a chemical compound called cinnamaldehyde.

    The word cinnamon comes from the Greek kinnamomon.

    Cinnamon is mentioned in Chinese writings as far back as 2800 BC.

    In the book of Exodus, God instructs Moses to make a holy anointing oil out of cinnamon, cassia, olive oil, myrrh, and hemp. (Exodus 30: 22-33).

    There was an ancient belief in something called the Cinnamon Bird that supposedly lived in Arabia and used cinnamon to build its nests. Herodotus wrote that these birds flew to an unknown land to collect the cinnamon and took it back with them to Arabia. The Arabians got the cinnamon from the birds by tempting them with large chunks of raw meat. The birds took the heavy pieces of meat back to their nests, which caused the nests to fall and the cinnamon to rain down and be collected by the people.

    Pliny the Elder wrote that the Cinnamon Bird did not exist and was a tale invented to raise the price of cinnamon.

    Pliny also wrote that 350 grams of cinnamon were equal in value to five kilograms of silver.

    In Ancient Egypt, cinnamon was used in the embalming process.

    The Egyptians also used cinnamon medicinally and as a flavoring in food and beverages.

    Cinnamon was used on funeral pyres in Ancient Rome. In 65 AD, Nero burned a year’s supply of cinnamon at his second wife Poppaea Sabina’s funeral in order to show the depth of his grief.

    In the Middle Ages, cinnamon was only affordable by the wealthy elite of society. A person’s social rank could be determined by the number of spices they could afford.

    From the 16th to the 19th centuries, there were power struggles among European nations over who would control Ceylon and the very lucrative cinnamon industry. In 1833, other countries began growing cinnamon and the need to control Ceylon diminished.

    Hypocras is a famous centuries-old spiced wine that is spiced with cinnamon. It is named after Greek physician Hippocrates, who was believed to have invented it in the 5th century BC, though the exact origin is unclear. Hypocras is generally not produced commercially anymore, though it is still produced in small amounts in some regions of France.

    Cinnamon has many health benefits. It has shown promise in the treatment of diabetes, arthritis, high cholesterol, memory function, and even leukemia and lymphoma.

    Two teaspoons of cinnamon has about 12 calories.

     
  2. saadia

    May 22, 2012 at 10:44 AM

    informative

     

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