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Ways to do the lymphatic detoxification massage

06 May

The Massage

Step 1. The client lies on her/his back. Place your hands on the upper part of the rib cage (mainly on the sternum). Ask your client to inhale and exhale. In the next inhalation, resist the expansion of the rib cage with moderate pressure.Release the pressure upon exhalation.  With resistance of rib cage expansion, we cause the diaphragm muscles to work harder.  The degree of the diaphragm muscle contractions projects the level of negativity of intrapleural pressure.  The more negative intrapleural pressure we create, the bigger the volume of lymph that drains  into the circulatory system. Repeat the rib cage expansion 5-6 times.

Step 2. Ask your client to turn her/his head to the right. Place your hand on the junction area of the thoracic duct and the brachiocephalic vein. Apply pressure (pumping action) upon exhalation. Repeat these techniques 5-6 times.

Step 3. Ask your client to turn her/his head to the left. Place your hand on the junction area of the right lymphatic duct and the superior vena cava.  Apply pressure (pumping action) upon exhalation. Repeat these techniques 5-6 times.

Step 4. Place your fist on the client’s navel area.  When the client exhales, perform pumping techniques under moderate pressure. Given the fact that the biggest lymphatic vessels including the cisterna chyli are on this level, this pumping effort is extremely important for acceleration of lymphatic fluid progression to the thoracic duct. Repeat this technique 5-6 times.

Lymphatic nodes are mechanical and chemical filters.  After massive acceleration of lymph drainage through lymphatic nodes,  connective tissue within them often becomes tense, which in turn reduces their drainage and filtering capability.  Therefore, it is very important to massage all lymphatic nodes in a gentle manner in order to release this connective tissue tension. If you palpate any swellings, enlargements, or tenderness in the lymphatic nodes, do not massage those nodes.

You should recommend the client to see her/his physician.

Step 5. Place the tips of the fingers on the submandibular lymph nodes, and under moderate/light pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times).

Step 6. Place the tips of the fingers on the submental lymph nodes, and under moderate pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times).

Step 7. Place the tips of the fingers on the cervical lymph nodes, and under moderate/light pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times

Step 8. Place the tips of the fingers on the axillary lymph nodes, and under moderate/light pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times

Step 9. Place the tips of the fingers on the cubital lymph nodes, and under moderate/light pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times).

Step 10. Place the tips of the fingers on the inguinal lymph nodes, and under moderate/light pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times).

Step 11. Place the tips of the fingers on the popliteal lymph nodes, and under moderate/light pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times).

Step 12. Place the tips of the fingers on the malleolar lymph nodes, and under moderate/light pressure, massage the nodes in a circular motion (5-6 times).

As stated previously, the pores of lymphatic vessels are large. Therefore, the proposed steps of pumping and direction of lymphatic fluid to the lymphatic nodes must be performed gently and with a lot of sense.  If kneading techniques are performed instead of pumping, lymphatic fluid will be removed from the lymphatic vessels to the extracellular space instead of being directed to the nodes, thoracic duct, and right lymphatic duct.

Step 13. With both hands, perform pumping techniques on the lateral sides of the lower leg with a combinationof light strokes directed toward the lymph nodes.  Proceed with the same technique on the front thighs.

Step 14. With the client lying in an anatomical position, perform pumping techniques on the forearm and arm,accompanied with light strokes directed toward the lymph nodes.

Step 15. Ask your client to lie on her/his stomach. Perform pumping techniques on the lower leg and back thigh, accompanied by strokes directed toward the lymph nodes.

Step 16. Place both hands on the lumbar region. Move your strokes toward the lateral part of the lower back and proceed in the direction of the axillary lymph nodes. Repeat 5-6 times.

The total time of the session is approximately forty-five minutes. Usually the proposed protocol on the anterior and posterior are completed in 20-25 minutes.

Repeat the proposed protocol twice.

Boosting Immunity

Please understand that lymph drainage techniques are not massage techniques at all!

There is no doubt that usual massage therapy techniques can contribute somewhat to the acceleration of lymph drainage, but not significantly. 

The large pores of lymphatic vessels, under application of pressure, allow the lymph to move back into the extracellular spaces instead of proceeding through the lymphatic vessels to the lymphatic nodes and ducts. Its simplicity and contribution to well-being puts the discipline of lymphatic drainage for detoxification in a unique position of value. 

For example, a person receives vaccination against the flu that initiates antibody production in the body. Existence of flu antibodies (the immune system warriors) means that this person has acquired resistance to the flu virus. But this person has a considerable accumulation of toxins in her body.

This means that her/his acquired immune system is significantly depressed, and that her body has a lowered ability to defend against infection. This depression of immune system function can easily be restored by detoxifying this person’s body.

Disciplined lymphatic drainage can cause significant detoxification, which in turn boosts the function of the already acquired immune capabilities.

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Posted by on May 6, 2011 in healing, health, naturopathy

 

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