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Healthy Lungs are vital!

                                  How To Save Your Lungs Before It’s Too Late

We don’t put enough emphasis on protecting our lungs against harmful macro and microscopic particles; this is a huge mistake, as reduced lung capacity is more damaging to quality of life than say, sub-optimal digestion, mild to moderate liver dysfunction, or even reduced cardiac output.

 

Why are healthy lungs so vital to the rest of your organs and body parts?,fres

It’s within the very thinnest branches of tissue that line the base of your lungs where your body accepts oxygen from your environment and expels carbon dioxide. Without this ongoing exchange of gases, you can’t adequately convert nutrients from food into usable energy.

 How to measure lung dysfunction?

 Inspection

Look for signs of strained breathing.

Other obvious signs of lung dysfunction are slightly purple/blue lips or fingernails, and audible distress with breathing.

Palpation

Place your hands symmetrically on both sides of the posterior aspect of a person’s ribcage; see if your hands move about the same amount during deep inhalation. Asymmetrical movement might indicate abnormal presence of fluid or air in the space between the lungs and the chest wall.

Also feel the transmission of the person’s voice as vibration (called tactile fremitus) against your palms as they’re pressed up against his/her chest wall

Percussion

To help confirm palpatory findings, percussion is used, where you use your hands to steadily percuss against the chest wall while listening to how hollow or full the chest cavity sounds along different points.

Auscultation

Auscultation is the process of listening to lung sounds with a stethoscope. During auscultation, try to hear what they call “vesicular breath sounds,” which is to describe a mild influx of air with inhalation, and little sound during exhalation.

Whistling-type noises, scratchy sounds, noise that resembles what you hear when breathing through a snorkel, gurgling, and an abnormally quiet lung field all indicate some form of distress.

Here’s the thing: you don’t want to wait for your doctor to stumble upon an abnormal finding before becoming mindful of what you’re breathing in during everyday activities. In most cases, by the time of a significant finding using the screening procedures described above, chances are that dysfunction and disease have been at play for a good while.

Living in a neighborhood with good air quality is a huge plus.

The most important priority in preventing lung disease is to minimize exposure to concentrated sources of lung irritants, and where such exposure is near impossible to avoid.

It’s vital to take proper precaution with optimal ventilation and protective gear.

When sanding down minor repair jobs, drilling into wood, or doing any other basic chores that require being close to even a small cloud of dust, it’s well worth the effort to wear a respirator with a decent filter.

Wear a mask when landscaping or where there is regular cutting of fresh stone, which kicks up all sorts of lung irritants like fiberglass and carborundum grit.

To those who cut stone or sand drywall joints for a living and feel fine after taking a good long shower after work (all without wearing a respirator), remind them that repeated exposure to irritants can lead to numbing of our natural feedback mechanisms, kind of like how a smoker eventually learns to inhale tobacco smoke without experiencing much of a negative physiological reaction.

 Please remember that it’s not just visible dust that you should strive to avoid and protect yourself against. If chemicals that you work with give off strong smells that make you feel nauseous, you need to figure out how to avoid these substances – nausea that’s triggered by stimulation of your olfactory system is a strong sign that you’re in the presence of lung irritants that, over time, can create irreversible damage.

Here’s a look at six substances that are highly capable of causing lung damage:

1. Crystalline silica

Crystalline silica is a component of soil, sand, and rocks (like granite and quartzite). Only quartz and cristobalite silica that can be inhaled as particles are designated known carcinogens.

Where is it found?

  • In the air during mining, cutting, and drilling.
  • Drywall mud, household cleaners, paints, glass, brick, ceramics, silicon metals in electronics, plastics, paints, and abrasives in soaps.

 

Occupations most at risk:

Quarry workers, plasterers, drywallers, construction workers, brick workers, miners, stonecutters (including jewellery), workers involved in drilling, polishing, and crushing, pottery makers, glassmakers, soap or detergent manufacturers, farmers, dentists, and auto workers.

 

2. Wood dust

Wood dust is made up of particles of wood that are created by cutting and sanding.

 

Where is it found?

  • Anywhere wood is chipped, turned, drilled, or sanded.

Occupations most at risk:

Those in the construction industry, and to some extent, those in the logging industry.

 

3. Asbestos

Asbestos is a group of naturally occurring minerals that form heat-resistant fibers.

 

Where is it found?

  • Naturally in rock formations.
  • In some auto parts like brakes, gaskets, and friction products.
  • In some industrial textiles.
  • In some safety clothing.

 

Occupations most at risk:

Asbestos miners, brake repair mechanics, building demolition or maintenance workers, carpenters, cabinetmakers, construction workers, electricians, plumbers, plaster and drywall installers, auto mechanics.

 

4. Chromium (hexavalent)

Chromium is a naturally occurring mineral that becomes carcinogenic when it is transformed into its hexavalent form through industrial processes.

 

Where is it found?

  • In the manufacturing of stainless steel and other alloys.
  • In the industrial wood preservative, CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate).
  • Used in small amounts in printer ink toners, textile dyes, and during water treatment.

 

Occupations most at risk:

Welders while welding stainless steel, printing machine and press operators, machinists, and pipefitters.

 

5. Nickel and its compounds

Metallic nickel, a possible carcinogen, is a silver-like, hard metal or grey powder. Nickel compounds, known carcinogens, tend to be green to black, but yellow when heated.

 

Where is it found?

Used to make stainless steel, and also found in magnets, electrical contacts, batteries, spark plugs, and surgical/dental prostheses.

 

Occupations most at risk:

Welders, construction millwrights, industrial mechanics, metal spraying workers, machinists, machining/tooling inspectors, nickel refinery workers, iron/steel mill workers, metal ore miners, and manufacturers in structural metals, motor vehicle parts, boilers, and shipping containers.

 

6. Formaldehyde

Associated cancers:

Nasopharyngeal cancer, leukemia

What is it?

A colorless, combustible gas with a pungent odor.

 

Where is it found?

  • Used in the manufacture of textiles, resins, wood products, and plastics.
  • As a preservative, formaldehyde is found in embalming fluid.
  • As a preservative and disinfectant, it’s used in soaps, shampoos, deodorants, mouthwash, and cosmetics.

 

Occupations most at risk:

Embalmers, pathology lab operators, wood and paper product workers, and health care professionals (nurses, dentists) exposed during use of medicinal products that contain formaldehyde. Also at risk are painters, manual laborers, product assemblers, foundry workers, and those who teach in cadaver laboratories.

 

How Important Are Your Lungs?

Consider that of the total amount of waste materials that your body eliminates via urine, stools, mucous, breath, and sweat, approximately 75 percent by volume is handled by your lungs. Put another way, your lungs are at least as important to your body’s ability to experience ongoing cleansing and detoxification as your digestive tract and kidneys. And to maintain healthy lungs, you have to minimize your exposure to the pollutants described above.

Beyond avoiding concentrated pollutants, here are a few tips to help ensure healthy gas exchange within your lungs:

 

  1. First and most obviously, you need to be around fresh air. This means being outdoors often, and when you’re indoors for long stretches at a time, you should try to crack open a window or two whenever possible. Or at the very least, ensure that the ventilation system that controls the air quality in your work and living spaces is functioning properly – this includes making sure that furnace filters are replaced regularly.

It also means that while you sleep, when the weather permits, you should crack open a window so that your lungs are exposed to a steady stream of fresh oxygen, and that the air in your room doesn’t get dominated by carbon dioxide.

  1. Second, you need to be mindful of how well you’re breathing. Respiratory rate – the number of cycles of inhalation and exhalation you experience per minute, is affected by a few different factors.

Emotional stress tends to promote shallow breathing. So being mindful of your emotional state and making a habit of taking purposeful, deep breaths in and out as often as possible make for a concrete strategy to ensure optimal intake of oxygen and elimination of carbon dioxide.

  1. An often-overlooked determinant of respiratory rate is how healthy your spine and surrounding joints are. Together, your spine, ribcage, and sternum (breast bone) form a protective case that surrounds your heart and lungs. At every point of contact between your ribs and your spine and breast bone, there is some joint play – that is, built-in room to move, not a lot, but enough to allow for optimal expansion of your lungs as you inhale.

Also, from rib to rib, you have cartilage that helps keep your ribs in place, but that also provides just enough give to allow your ribs to slightly expand and contract as your breathe.

Over time, chronic stress, lack of exercise, and lack of mindful breathing can cause all of these moving parts to become somewhat brittle and unable to provide the flexibility that is essential to helping you breathe optimally.

This is one reason why regular stretching of your spine, ribcage, and surrounding tissues is important to your health. By keeping all of these joints moving properly, you ensure that you have the physical capacity to fill your lungs with ample amounts of oxygen throughout the day and night.

 

Beyond stretching these areas, please remember the importance of mindfully breathing in and out throughout the day – this seemingly trivial habit can be immensely helpful to your health.

And don’t forget to wear a protective mask or respirator the next time you have some sanding or drilling to do.

 

Please consider sharing this information with family and friends who may be incurring lung tissue damage without knowing it.

 

Thank you.

 
 

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Fast Forward a Smile! ( my new upcoming happy book)

( My book is not designed to provide psychological advice or to substitute for professional counsel. Its purpose is to increase your happiness by making you aware of the Consequences of all your thoughts and actions).

 
This is a prologue to my book:
 
When you  read this book, you may have several questions running through your head about me.
 
  • Why did I write How to be Happy and Have Fun Changing the World?
  • Will this book be able to deliver the goods or am I just a dreamer?
  • If the insights revealed in this book can make you happy or happier and help improve the world, why would I give something so valuable away for free?

I wrote this book for several reasons. The first one is because I love sharing the insights contained in this book with others and it makes me very happy.

The second one is because I wanted to reach a mass audience by addressing a subject that would appeal to most, if not all, of the people living in our country.

After all who doesn’t desire to be happy or happier and make our world a better place for themselves, their children and their children’s children?

The third reason is because I needed a feedback mechanism that you can easily relate to and cannot deny.

Everyone knows whether they are happy or unhappy. You can decide for yourself what gives you true and lasting happiness. You will be able to judge for yourself if what I share with you makes total sense.

The most important reason is that this book allows me to introduce you to eight words that will help you increase your self-awareness and happiness.

These eight words will help you make better choices that will change you and the world for the better, in the process. If you want to be happier and remain happy, this book will show you the way.

These words are:

“I am always truthful, positive and helping others.” 

(These words have become my motto and of the 869 children I do volunteer work with in St Mary’s High School, Bedian Road Lahore)

Try repeating them to yourself for thirty days and implementing them in your life and you will feel a remarkable uplift and serenity.

If you can honestly say that you’re totally happy with all aspects of your life, are you happy with what is going on in the world?

Unless you never follow the local news and world affairs, or live in a cave in the Himalayas, you’re probably not happy about something or at least would like to improve it if you knew an effective way to bring about positive change. I would like you to reflect on this poem:

“The Joy of Life”

This is the true joy of life.

The being used for a purpose; recognized by yourself ; as a mighty one.

The being a force of nature instead of a feverish and selfish clod of ailments and grieving senses complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy.

I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the whole community and that as long as I live it is my privilege to do for it whatever I can.

I want to be thoroughly used up when I die. For the harder I work, the more I live.

I rejoice in life for its own sake. Life is no brief candle to me.

It is a sort of splendid torch that I have got to hold up for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.

 -George Bernard Shaw

THOUGHTS:

As previously discussed, your positive and negative thoughts cause your brain to secrete chemicals. These chemicals, in turn, affect all your natural abilities and functions. Your thoughts have two components: facts and emotions. Every stimulus you receive through your nervous system is nothing more than a fact. However, you attach emotions to these facts.

It is imperative for you to realize that negative emotions cause adverse chemical secretions and hinder your natural abilities. Increase your awareness of the profound influence negative emotions have on your brain’s chemistry, performance and happiness. Become more objective and restructure any negative emotional attachment you have to certain facts.

Facts are merely facts. However, you can choose your emotional response to them.

 DIET/NUTRITION:

Everything you eat and drink is a chemical, which affects your performance and how you feel. If you doubt this, observe how a person’s behavior changes when they drink some alcohol. Better yet, ask them how they feel the next day if they drank too much.

Since there are many good books available on nutrition, I will just briefly touch on this subject. In the early cave dwelling days there were no factories and no processed foods. Humans are designed to live on natural foods with the proper amounts of protein, carbohydrates and fat.

Eat wisely and in moderation. Also, do not become neurotic about what you eat. Your emotional state is far more important than what you eat, even though what you eat is important.

EXERCISE:

Most individuals are out of shape. How about you?

In the early days of time, humans engaged in many forms of physical activity just to survive. Your body is designed to function properly with physical exertion so it can remove toxins and secrete beneficial chemicals. If you do not believe this, exercise the next time you are depressed. Notice how much better you feel after exercising.

For your body and mind to function at their best, it is important to exercise to make up for the lack of physical activity resulting from today’s modern conveniences.

Is 20 minutes of aerobic exercise three times a week too great a price to pay for a healthy body and an alert mental state?

REST:

Sufficient rest is necessary for the body to eliminate toxins and rejuvenate itself.

Have you ever noticed that you sleep more when depressed than when you are excited and happy to be alive?

While you sleep, your brain is busy processing all the information it received during the day so that it can make spontaneous decisions when you’re awake.

ENVIRONMENT:

When I refer to environment, I’m not just talking about the air you breathe and your physical surroundings. I am more concerned with the people around you. The electromagnetic fields they generate, as well as their thoughts and actions, can adversely affect you.

I strongly recommend associating only with positive people, or keep to yourself. The only time you should associate with negative people is when you are trying to help them. Your stronger electromagnetic field and positive thoughts and actions will have a positive effect on them.

Researchers have found that emotions, positive and negative alike, are nearly as contagious as colds and flu. You can catch feelings of elation, euphoria, sadness and more from friends, family, colleagues, even strangers.

Mood “infection” happens in milliseconds, says Elaine Hatfield, a psychology professor at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu and a coauthor of Emotional Contagion (Cambridge University Press, 1994).

When interacting with a negative person, take extra steps to remain positive. Otherwise, you may be influenced by his or her negativity.

 PHYSIOLOGY: Your body reflects your emotional state. When you are positive and confident, you stand erect with your chest out and a smile on your face. If you just won Rs.10,000,000 in a prize bond, imagine how you would feel and how your physiology would respond ?

You would feel on top of the world. Everyone watching you will see it by the way you carry yourself.

Imagine how you would feel and look if you lost your winning prize bond. If this depressed you, your eyes would be down and your shoulders slumped. Some individuals would probably feel like killing themselves for losing their winning bond.

Your physiology works both ways. Your body reflects your feelings.

However, how you carry your body affects your feelings. One of the quickest and easiest ways to improve your chemistry is to change your physiology. By taking slow deep breaths, standing tall and sticking your chest out, you automatically increase your chemistry and immediately feel better. Raise your eyes to the sky and smile right now. Do you feel a change in your energy and alertness? If you always carry yourself like a winner, you will feel like a winner.

Your thoughts, diet/nutrition, exercise, rest, environment and physiology have a positive or negative impact on your brain’s chemistry that affects how well you perform and feel. To become happier and more successful, part of the process is to consciously work on increasing the chemistry of your cranial fluid so your brain can perform more efficiently and at higher levels.

” If you give sincere happiness to others only than will you receive true happiness.”

It Is all about attitude!

 
 

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